Where we work
JRS programmes, found in 50 countries worldwide, provide assistance to nearly 950,000 individuals. This service provision is overseen by 10 regional offices with support from the International Office in Rome. For the contact details of each regional office, click on the map and see the details below.

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 Zimbabwe
Joan


Southern Africa
Regional Office

tim.smith@jrs.net
+27 11 618 3404
http://www.jrssaf.org

JRS Southern Africa is one of 10 geographic regions of the Jesuit Refugee Service, an international Catholic organisation affiliated to the Society of Jesus. The regional office in Southern Africa supports country programmes in Angola, Malawi, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. With a mandate to serve refugees and forcibly displaced persons, country projects include assisting refugees to access education, healthcare, and offering small business support.

In Angola, JRS institutes legal workshops for refugees and government officials in order to educate individuals about the rights of refugees. JRS also assists refugees in filing appeals if they have been denied refugee status.

In Malawi, JRS works with Jesuit Commons: Higher Education on the Margins in Dzaleka refugee camp to bring a variety of educational initiatives to displaced persons. JRS also brings psychosocial programmes to refugees and displaced persons requiring psychosocial support.

In Zimbabwe, JRS works in Tongogara refugee camp to bring skills training to refugees and displaced persons. These trainings include computing, hairdressing, cosmetology and sewing classes. There are also initiatives that work to bring accredited education and scholarship programmes to students in the camp.

In South Africa, JRS works with refugees in urban areas like Johannesburg and Pretoria to generate income. Since Johannesburg is home to the largest urban refugee population in the world, JRS works tirelessly with refugees to create sustainable livelihoods and vocational training and assistance in setting up small businesses.



Zimbabwe: More Than a Decade on, Much Suffering and a Refugee is Still Hopeful

His name is John Kabongo Ngoie, a 37 year old refugee from the Democratic Republic of Congo. He arrived at Tongogara Refugee Camp, in Zimbabwe on the 28th February 2003. He left his home, a village in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), embarking on a long journey – a journey that took three days – from DRC through Zambia into Zimbabwe.
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Zimbabwe: Life for a Professional in a Refugee Camp, Not Easy, but Spirits Remain High

He is the librarian and a translator at Tongogara Refugee Camp in Zimbabwe. However, the xenophobic violence that struck South Africa in January and April 2015, moved him so, that he authored a series of poems which he compiled into an anthology entitled “Xenophobia”.
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Zimbabwe: Celebration in the Heat and Dust of Tongogara Refugee Camp

The tragedy, persecution and difficulties that led these 267 graduates to leave the countries of their birth, to Tongogara Refugee Camp, here in the remoteness of Zimbabwe’s rural outreaches, is momentarily forgotten. They are graduating from the Vocational Skills Training (VST) Programme, organised and run by the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) in Zimbabwe.
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Zimbabwe: Update - From Piglets to Weaners, The Piggery Project Grows

Although central to the project, it is not just about rearing pigs. But the first batch of piglets have now been weaned, being 3 to 4 weeks.These weaners are going to be passed on once they are porkers – when they reach 30 kg to 60 kg in weight. The aim of the project and the reason why the pigs are being bred, is to empower as many women as possible. With each litter produced, the eventual aim is to pass some of those piglets out of the litter on to the next group of women the project wishes to benefit.
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Zimbabwe: JRS assists victims of the government’s operation to “restore order”

In mid-May 2005, the police started demolishing what they described as “illegal structures” mostly in high density suburbs and informal settlements around Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe. The operation within no time spread like wildfire to other towns, growth points, service centres and some shops in the rural areas were also demolished in the process.
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