Latin America and the Caribbean projects


 Latin America and the Caribbean
JRS has two areas of focus in this region: the Colombian civil war and the plight of the Haitian people. Serving Colombian IDPs as well as refugees in three neighbouring countries, JRS is present not in camps but mostly in border areas and in city suburbs, where people displaced by violence in rural areas live in exclusion. The work among the Haitian people takes place on the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, in Santo Domingo, and, since 2010, in camps of earthquake survivors in Port-au-Prince.

JRS has been present in Latin America since the early 80s, long before it started to reach out to people displaced by these two humanitarian crises. The JRS commitment in this region developed in 1982 among Salvadoran refugees in Honduras, and, in 1984, in El Salvador itself. JRS stayed in this country for nearly 10 years before handing over to the local Jesuit Development Service. Another important intervention was among Guatemalan refugees in Mexico, from 1991 to 1997.

Attention began to shift to present-day concerns in the early 90s. Present in Colombia from 1994 onwards, JRS serves in places badly affected by the violence: Soacha, a suburb of Bogota; Magdalena Medio; Valle del Cauca and, since 2010, North Santander. Apart from the civil conflict, a growing challenge in Colombia is increased displacement due to the development of mega-projects and mining corporations, which are uprooting communities from their ancestral lands. The emphasis of JRS in Colombia is to build communities where people can live in peace and dignity. Diverse activities include livelihood programmes, counselling, human rights training, and awareness-raising.

In neighbouring Venezuela, Panama and Ecuador, JRS supports Colombian refugees, offering a range of services that includes legal and psychosocial support, educational and livelihood programmes, and aid to meet basic needs, where needed. There is an emphasis on local integration, working with host communities to welcome the refugees.

The mission among the Haitian people dates back to the early 90s and deals with different albeit pressing displacement issues. The defence of Haitian migrants, who live a precarious and right-less existence in the Dominican Republic, has long been the focal point of JRS intervention. Before the 2010 Haiti quake, it was estimated that there were between 500,000 to 800,000 Haitians in the Dominican Republic.  JRS intervenes through a national project entitled Solidaridad Fronteriza (Border Solidarity), and is also part of a network lobbying for the right to citizenship for Haitians born in the Dominican Republic.

The earthquake that struck Haiti on 12 January 2010 led to a new dimension of JRS work. JRS initially delivered emergency aid and, in March 2010, opened an office in Port-au-Prince and focused its intervention of pastoral and psychosocial accompaniment in seven camps of quake survivors located in three sectors of Port-au-Prince.


Latin America and the Caribbean

tecnico.comunicacion@sjrlac.org
+57 1 3681466
http://sjrlac.org



Colombia: The challenge of peacebuilding

Bogotá, 1 June 2017 - For 50 long years, armed groups have embroiled Colombia in conflict. During the most intense period from 1990 to 2004 – when, according to international standards, it reached the level of a "major armed conflict" – it affected practically the entire country.
>>>

Colombia: The challenge of peacebuilding

Bogotá, 1 June 2017 - For 50 long years, armed groups have embroiled Colombia in conflict. During the most intense period from 1990 to 2004 – when, according to international standards, it reached the level of a "major armed conflict" – it affected practically the entire country.
>>>

Colombia: The challenge of peacebuilding

Bogotá, 1 June 2017 - For 50 long years, armed groups have embroiled Colombia in conflict. During the most intense period from 1990 to 2004 – when, according to international standards, it reached the level of a "major armed conflict" – it affected practically the entire country.
>>>

Colombia: The challenge of peacebuilding

Bogotá, 1 June 2017 - For 50 long years, armed groups have embroiled Colombia in conflict. During the most intense period from 1990 to 2004 – when, according to international standards, it reached the level of a "major armed conflict" – it affected practically the entire country.
>>>

Colombia: Women contribute to peace through the promotion of health

Cúcuta, Norte de Santander, 10 April 2017 - In order to make the work experiences that have emerged from the continuous work of accompanying, serving and advocating for people in a situation of forced displacement or refuge better known, the peace initiatives led by women and accompanied by the national teams belonging to the Jesuit Refugee Service in the region of Latin America and the Caribbean have been systematised.
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